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How to buy tickets

Three ways to buy match tickets and passes

Tickets and passes on general sale for Scotland, Glasgow Warriors and Edinburgh Rugby can be bought in three ways: online, by phone and in person. Tickets for some of the more popular Scotland games are released in batches over a number of months. This is because a number of Scottish Rugby stakeholders – e.g. clubs, debentures, visiting unions – have prior access to tickets, and the deadlines by which they have to confirm their requirements vary throughout the season. In such cases, a Waiting List may be opened.

Scottish Rugby does not encourage supporters to purchase tickets from anyone other than official sources. If you are unsure, please check with the Ticket Centre before processing any order and please read our terms and conditions http://www.scottishrugby.org/ticketterms.

Help your club earn commission on ticket sales!
Rugby clubs can earn up to 15% commission on Scotland match tickets if supporters and members purchase through either the club’s ticket secretary or individually online. If you want to support your rugby club in this way, simply click on your club’s name from the list at this page, and you’ll be taken to the Scottish Rugby Online Ticket Centre where you make your purchase in the normal way. If you do this, your club will then be credited with commission on your purchase.

Scottish Rugby Online Ticket Centre

This is where you will find tickets to Scotland, Glasgow Warriors and Edinburgh Rugby home games, as well as car park passes for Scotland games.

To purchase tickets for the Royal Bank of Scotland Scottish Varsity Matches, please click below:

Buy through your rugby club ticket centre and earn extra cash for the club!

Don’t forget – if you want to help your club earn valuable commission, please purchase your tickets via your club’s unique ticketing website. Click here and find the link to your club’s ticketing centre. Note: Some clubs have not enrolled in the scheme, so if you can’t see your club name, contact your ticket secretary for more information or contact Scottish Rugby at [email protected] .

2. By Telephone/E-mail

Scotland Match Tickets: 0844 847 2357 (calls charged at 7pm per minute plus your standard access charge).

For Accessible Seating Sales and Enquiries contact 0131 346 5160 (Monday to Friday, 10am to 4pm)

Edinburgh and Glasgow Match Tickets: 0131 346 5160 (Monday to Friday, 10am to 4pm) or e-mail [email protected]

Post sales or Customer Services: 0131 346 5160 (Monday to Friday, 10am to 4pm) or e-mail [email protected]

3. In Person

Tickets can be purchased from the following outlets:

Scottish Rugby Ticket Centre
BT Murrayfield
Edinburgh EH12 5PJ

Open Monday-Friday, 10.00am-5.00pm

Supporter Travel Packages

Supporter travel packages are available directly from Gullivers Sports Travel online or by calling 01684 293175.

6 Nations 2018 Scotland England

BT Murrayfield Stadium

Sat February 24, 16:45

Hello, don’t miss out on Scotland v England

The lone piper, the smoke, the slow walk – Edinburgh is a matchday atmosphere of the ages.
And that’s not all. Edinburgh is a beautifully contained, historic rugby city. From the soaring castle to drinks on Princes Street this is a rugby weekend that has it all – and we want you there.

Filter these packages:

  • Day returns
  • 1 night
  • 2 nights
  • 3 nights
  • 4+ nights
    • Scotland v England
    Day Return – Scotland Vs England – 6 Nations 2018
      • Scotland v England
      Two Night Weekend Break – Scotland Vs England – 6 Nations 2018
        • Scotland v England
        Two Night Weekend Break With Flights – Scotland Vs England – 6 Nations 2018

        BT Murrayfield Stadium

        There is more to Edinburgh than Hogmanay and festival time in August – it is easily one of Europe’s most beautiful cities.

        It’s been described as the ‘Athens of the North’ but ‘Auld Reekie’ is a city of loud, crowded pubs, great restaurants, late-night parties and history. And it has also been the scene of many English disasters at Murrayfield.

        David Sole’s infamously slow walk onto the field in 1990 was the catalyst to a seething Grand Slam victory and 10 years later Andy Nicol’s try tore the wheels off another England clean sweep attempt in the driving Scottish rain.

        Edinburgh’s rugby is much like its landscape – craggy, rock hard and steeped in history. It is an earthy place where each summer the world’s biggest arts festival rises from the ashes of last year’s rave reviews to produce another show-stopper. And it is here where the Scottish Parliament sits again after a 300-year absence.

        It is a raw and rugged treat for rugby fans, a city of contrasts and extremes – from the castle silhouetted against a blue sky, late night snugs and pubs with a treasure trove of whiskey’s, a cafe in the Old Town for a coffee and the dark mouths of the alleys – each with a different site, smell and experience.

        Edinburgh is a gem of a place – not just for rugby lovers but for lovers of life. It has something for every taste and experience and even the most seasoned travellers and rugby fans will find something new on each visit.

        BT Murrayfield Stadium, located in the west end of Edinburgh, is the home of the Scottish Rugby Union (SRU).

        Getting there.

        BT Murrayfield Stadium Edinburgh EH12 5PJ

        Edinburgh could be one of the most underrated rugby cities in Europe. From the looming castle to drinks in Princes Street to a memorable night-time kick off at Murrayfield, Scotland is a great rugby getaway.

        And that’s not all. With the way Scotland are playing right now it could be one of the clashes of the season. They have found some belief, pace and precision and will relish taking on the auld enemy.

        They have not held on to the Calcutta Cup for several years and will relish the chance of putting a major hurdle in England’s way. It has every ingredient to be very special.

        TM © England Rugby Travel 2008 – 2018. All rights reserved.

        Six Nations 2016: Scotland 29-18 France

        BBC Sport Scotland

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        Scotland ended a 10-year winless streak against France to record back-to-back Six Nations victories for the first time in three years.

        The hosts recovered from Guilhem Guirado’s early try to lead 18-5 after Stuart Hogg and Duncan Taylor tries, the latter a superb individual effort.

        Gael Fickou’s score reduced France’s half-time deficit, and two Maxime Machenaud penalties made it 21-18.

        But Hogg’s brilliant overhead pass saw Tim Visser’s try secure victory.

        Greig Laidlaw’s penalty with five minutes left added further gloss to a rapturously received triumph, their first over France since 2006.

        It also ended a demoralising sequence of seven straight home Six Nations defeats at Murrayfield over three years since Ireland were beaten in 2013.

        Scotland’s victory confirmed England, who beat Wales on Saturday for their fourth straight win, as Six Nations champions, the first time the title has been decided with a round to go.

        Early double blow

        The Scots may have started brightly, confidence buoyed by their 36-20 win in Rome a fortnight ago, but their momentum was checked inside five minutes.

        France set Murrayfield alight with some of the flair which appeared to have disappeared from their game, resulting in a try for their admirable captain Guirado.

        The hooker set Virimi Vakatawa away down the right, and after the wing slipped the ball inside to Wesley Fofana, Guirado was there to collect the scoring pass and plunge over.

        Fly-half Francois Trinh-Duc, on his return to the side, missed the conversion from a wide angle, and then what should have been a straightforward penalty attempt.

        So instead of a 10-0 deficit, within five minutes Scotland had turned the game on its head with two Laidlaw penalties, the second earned by a scrummage which continued to provide sustenance.

        It was an admirable response having lost Finn Russell to a head knock – the fly-half collided with flanker John Barclay’s outstretched leg – in the build-up to France’s try.

        But Russell’s replacement Peter Horne stepped into the breach superbly, and his half-break and offload to Richie Gray after a dozen phases allowed Hogg to dart over in the 33rd minute.

        Taylor-made try swells Scots’ belief

        Within four minutes. Murrayfield was on its feet again after a stunning solo score from Taylor.

        Taking a quick tap penalty 10 metres inside his own half, the Saracens centre sped up the right touchline, bulldozing through the attempted tackle of Vakatawa.

        As space opened up in front of him, the 26-year-old motored on, eluding Wenceslas Lauret before touching down for a thunderous try.

        Referee Glen Jackson did consult a television replay after a suspicion Laidlaw had impeded Lauret with a tug of his shirt, but was satisfied the Frenchman’s momentum had not been checked.

        Laidlaw added the conversion for an 18-5 lead, but a penalty conceded by Barclay with two minutes of the half left allowed France to strike back.

        The visitors kicked the penalty to touch on the right flank, launched a line-out drive and several phases later, Fickou sliced his way through in the left corner.

        Machenaud, taking over the kicking duties from Trinh-Duc, made it a six-point game at the interval.

        Hogg’s moment of magic

        Hogg’s monster 54-metre penalty early in the second half made it 21-12, but two Machenaud penalties reduced the gap to three points heading into the final quarter.

        The tension was lifted though in the 66th minute after bullocking charges from Alex Dunbar, Richie Gray and Willem Nel took Scotland to within inches of the French line.

        Laidlaw’s long pass looked on the speculative side, but Hogg flicked the ball over his head as he rose to meet it, giving Visser the simple task of diving over for his 11th Test try.

        Laidlaw was unable to land the conversion from wide out on the touchline, but made no mistake with a penalty five minutes from time to kick-start the Murrayfield celebrations.

        Man of the match

        Stuart Hogg was a constant danger with ball in hand, scored Scotland’s first try, banged over a penalty from 54 metres and his magical overhead pass for Visser’s try provided the game’s stand-out moment.

        Team line-ups:

        Scotland: Hogg, Seymour, Taylor, Dunbar, Visser, Russell, Laidlaw; Dickinson, Ford, Nel, R. Gray, J. Gray, Barclay, Hardie, Strauss.

        Replacements: Horne (for Russell, 5), Wilson (for Strauss, 62), McInally (for Ford, 67), Low (for Nel, 73), Swinson (for R Gray, 77).

        Not used: Sutherland, Hidalgo-Clyne, Lamont.

        France: Spedding, Fofana, Fickou, Mermoz, Vakatawa, Trinh-Duc, Machenaud; Poirot, Guirado, Slimani, Flanquart, Maestri, Camara, Lauret, Chouly.

        Replacements: Chat (for Guirado, 70), Pelo (for Poirot, 62), Atonio (for Slimani, 62), Vahaamahina (for Flanquart, 51), Goujon (for Camara, 64), Bezy (for Machenaud, 74), Plisson (for Trinh-Duc, 68), Medard (for Mermoz, 68).

        Six Nations 2018: Murrayfield can fire up Scotland v France – Greig Laidlaw

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        Greig Laidlaw has urged his Scotland team-mates to forget their Cardiff blues and rise to the challenge that awaits them against France on Sunday.

        The scrum-half will start his first Test in a year as the Scots look to get their Six Nations campaign back on track after their thumping by Wales.

        And Laidlaw wants to see his team give the Scotland fans reasons to be proud.

        “I’ve been hammering it into the boys that we need to get excited,” said Laidlaw, who will win his 60th cap.

        “We need to fill those jerseys up in front of our own people. We’ve only been beaten by New Zealand here in the past year so we are really excited to get our feet back on the ground at Murrayfield.

        “It’s a huge honour to be given the opportunity to wear that jersey, especially at home. It’s something special.

        “It’s been a testing week but we feel ready to go for Sunday.”

        Scotland won all three home Six Nations matches in 2017, plus autumn Tests against Samoa and Australia, and came agonisingly close to beating the All Blacks.

        Laidlaw has not started a Test for Scotland since suffering ankle ligament damage against France in Paris in the second match of last season’s Six Nations.

        His selection for the British and Irish Lions tour of New Zealand meant he was unavailable for Scotland’s summer tour, and a broken fibula ruled him out of the autumn Tests.

        In his absence, Ali Price moved into pole position for the number nine shirt, but an error-strewn display from the Glasgow Warrior in Cardiff opened the door for Laidlaw’s return to the side.

        “I was extremely frustrated to pick up the injury when I did after moving to a new club,” said Laidlaw, who joined French side Clermont Auvergne from Gloucester last summer.

        “In the long term I think it’s actually been a good thing for me. I came off the Lions tour and only had three weeks off before going straight to Clermont.

        “Even then my body was creaking a little bit when I still had a full season in front of me.

        “It is never great to be injured but the more experienced you get, the more you understand that perhaps it had come at a good time for me.

        “I had three and a half months out but I’ve managed to rehab really well and now I feel really good and I’m raring to go.”

        Laidlaw knows Scotland will have to combat the “big power game” France employ if they are to prevail on Sunday.

        Having captained Scotland more often than any other player, the former Edinburgh player will find himself in the unusual position of being vice-captain on Sunday.

        He was in line to retain the captaincy on the summer tour before the Lions call came, and again in the autumn, before injury struck again.

        In that time John Barclay has performed admirably in the captain’s role, and Laidlaw is happy to lend his support and experience to the flanker and the rest of the team.

        “‘Barcs’ has shown that he’s a good captain and will show that again at the weekend. It’s about the collective, not individuals.

        “I’ve always set about leading by example whenever I’ve played for Scotland and that won’t change whether I’m captain or not captain.

        “I will be demanding high standards firstly of myself and then secondly of the players round about me.”

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        The 2019 France Team v Scotland
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        Click on the ORANGE link above for real time France v Scotland rugby tickets

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        Six Nations 2019
        France v Scotland
        rugby tickets will be on 23/02/2019 at the home of French Rugby Union (FFR) – Stade de France in Paris.

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        Fans will snap up FrenchRugby Tickets in the hope recent changes will bring better fortunes.

        Scotland 32-26 France

        Date: Sunday 11th February 2018

        Venue: BT Murrayfield Stadium , Edinburgh

        Referee: John Lacey (Ireland)

        Attendance: 67,144

        Scotland v France Match Reports

        Scotland fought their way to a 32-26 victory over France at BT Murrayfield. In an entertaining first half, Teddy Thomas scored two tries for France, whilst Sean Maitland and Huw Jones both crossed for Scotland. After the break it came down to penalties, and man-of-the-match Greig Laidlaw nailed all six of his penalty kicks to take the win for Scotland. A selection of match reports is listed below:

        Scotland v France – Match Highlights

        Scotland v France – Match Stats

        Scotland: (14) 32
        Try: Maitland (13′), Jones (32′)
        Conversion: Laidlaw (14′, 33′)
        Penalty: Laidlaw (44′, 49′, 61′, 65′, 71′, 77′)

        France: (20) 26
        Try: Thomas (3′, 27′)
        Conversion: Machenaud (4′, 28′)
        Penalty: Machenaud (10′, 41’+1), Serin (47′, 58′)

        Man of The Match: Greig Laidlaw (Scotland)

        Scotland v France – Team Line-ups

        Scotland Team Line-up

        Forwards

        • 1 Gordon Reid
        • 2 Stuart McInally
        • 3 Simon Berghan
        • 4 Grant Gilchrist
        • 5 Jonny Gray
        • 6 John Barclay (CAPTAIN)
        • 7 Hamish Watson
        • 8 Ryan Wilson

        Backs

        • 9 Greig Laidlaw
        • 10 Finn Russell
        • 11 Sean Maitland
        • 12 Pete Horne
        • 13 Huw Jones
        • 14 Tommy Seymour
        • 15 Stuart Hogg

        Replacements

        • 16 Scott Lawson
        • 17 Jamie Bhatti
        • 18 Jon Welsh
        • 19 Ben Toolis
        • 20 David Denton
        • 21 Ali Price
        • 22 Chris Harris
        • 23 Blair Kinghorn

        France Team Line-up

        Forwards

        • 1 Jefferson Poirot
        • 2 Guilhem Guirado (CAPTAIN)
        • 3 Rabah Slimani
        • 4 Arthur Iturria
        • 5 Sébastien Vahaamahina
        • 6 Wenceslas Lauret
        • 7 Yacouba Camara
        • 8 Marco Tauleigne

        Backs

        • 9 Maxime Machenaud
        • 10 Lionel Beauxis
        • 11 Virimi Vakatawa
        • 12 Geoffrey Doumayrou
        • 13 Rémi Lamerat
        • 14 Teddy Thomas
        • 15 Geoffrey Palis

        Replacements

        • 16 Adrien Pelissie
        • 17 Eddy Ben Arous
        • 18 Cedate Gomes Sa
        • 19 Paul Gabrillagues
        • 20 Louis Picamoles
        • 21 Baptiste Serin
        • 22 Anthony Belleau
        • 23 Benjamin Fall

        Scotland v France 2018

        NatWest 6 Nations Fixtures 2018

        Below are the fixtures, dates and UK kick off times of the NatWest 6 Nations for 2018.

        ROUND ONE

        Wales v Scotland: February 3, 2.15pm, Cardiff, BBC

        France v Ireland: February 3, 4.45pm, Paris, BBC

        Italy v England: February 4, 3pm, Rome, ITV.

        ROUND TWO

        Ireland v Italy: February 10, 2.15pm, Dublin, ITV

        England v Wales: February 10, 4:45pm, London, ITV

        Scotland v France: February 11, 3pm, Edinburgh, BBC

        ROUND THREE

        Frances v Italy: February 23, 8pm, Marseille, ITV

        Ireland v Wales: February 24, 2.15pm, Dublin, BBC

        Scotland v England: February 24, 4.45pm, Edinburgh, BBC

        ROUND FOUR

        Ireland v Scotland: March 10, 2.15pm, Dublin, ITV

        France v England: March 10, 4:45pm, Paris, BBC

        Wales v Italy: March 11, 3pm, Cardiff, BBC

        ROUND FIVE

        Italy v Scotland: March 17, 12:30pm, Rome, ITV

        England v Ireland: March 17, 2:45pm, London, ITV

        Wales v France: March 17, 5pm, Cardiff, BBC

        6 Nations 2018 Scotland England

        BT Murrayfield Stadium

        Sat February 24, 16:45

        Hello, don’t miss out on Scotland v England

        The lone piper, the smoke, the slow walk – Edinburgh is a matchday atmosphere of the ages.
        And that’s not all. Edinburgh is a beautifully contained, historic rugby city. From the soaring castle to drinks on Princes Street this is a rugby weekend that has it all – and we want you there.

        Filter these packages:

        • Day returns
        • 1 night
        • 2 nights
        • 3 nights
        • 4+ nights
          • Scotland v England
          Day Return – Scotland Vs England – 6 Nations 2018
            • Scotland v England
            Two Night Weekend Break – Scotland Vs England – 6 Nations 2018
              • Scotland v England
              Two Night Weekend Break With Flights – Scotland Vs England – 6 Nations 2018

              BT Murrayfield Stadium

              There is more to Edinburgh than Hogmanay and festival time in August – it is easily one of Europe’s most beautiful cities.

              It’s been described as the ‘Athens of the North’ but ‘Auld Reekie’ is a city of loud, crowded pubs, great restaurants, late-night parties and history. And it has also been the scene of many English disasters at Murrayfield.

              David Sole’s infamously slow walk onto the field in 1990 was the catalyst to a seething Grand Slam victory and 10 years later Andy Nicol’s try tore the wheels off another England clean sweep attempt in the driving Scottish rain.

              Edinburgh’s rugby is much like its landscape – craggy, rock hard and steeped in history. It is an earthy place where each summer the world’s biggest arts festival rises from the ashes of last year’s rave reviews to produce another show-stopper. And it is here where the Scottish Parliament sits again after a 300-year absence.

              It is a raw and rugged treat for rugby fans, a city of contrasts and extremes – from the castle silhouetted against a blue sky, late night snugs and pubs with a treasure trove of whiskey’s, a cafe in the Old Town for a coffee and the dark mouths of the alleys – each with a different site, smell and experience.

              Edinburgh is a gem of a place – not just for rugby lovers but for lovers of life. It has something for every taste and experience and even the most seasoned travellers and rugby fans will find something new on each visit.

              BT Murrayfield Stadium, located in the west end of Edinburgh, is the home of the Scottish Rugby Union (SRU).

              Getting there.

              BT Murrayfield Stadium Edinburgh EH12 5PJ

              Edinburgh could be one of the most underrated rugby cities in Europe. From the looming castle to drinks in Princes Street to a memorable night-time kick off at Murrayfield, Scotland is a great rugby getaway.

              And that’s not all. With the way Scotland are playing right now it could be one of the clashes of the season. They have found some belief, pace and precision and will relish taking on the auld enemy.

              They have not held on to the Calcutta Cup for several years and will relish the chance of putting a major hurdle in England’s way. It has every ingredient to be very special.

              TM © England Rugby Travel 2008 – 2018. All rights reserved.

              Scotland 32-26 France live recap from Six Nations clash at Murrayfield as Greig Laidlaw kicks hosts to victory

              The Scots lost their opening game to Wales, while the French suffered a last gasp heartbreak at home to Ireland

              • Updated 17:43, 11 FEB 2018

              Greig Laidlaw booted 22 points on his return to Scotland’s starting line-up as Gregor Townsend’s men kick-started their NatWest 6 Nations campaign with a 32-26 win over France.

              The home side were under pressure to prove they were genuine contenders after being humiliated by Wales in last week’s opener in Cardiff.

              And they did just that, with tries from Sean Maitland and Huw Jones providing the perfect response after Teddy Thomas’ blistering pace had twice cut them apart.

              That left the game finely poised in the second half but Laidlaw – making his first Scotland start in a year – slotted over all eight of his kicks to breathe fresh life into Scottish championship hopes.

              Townsend had been drilling into his team all week the need to tighten up their accuracy following their self-inflicted defeat in Cardiff.

              So his frustration was understandable as his men missed three opportunities to halt Thomas scoring the first try after just three minutes.

              Remi Lamerat did the Racing 92 wing no favours by passing to his feet but even that did not stop Thomas as he handed off Finn Russell, side-stepped Peter Horne and then galloped past Stuart Hogg for the line.

              When Maxime Machenaud booted over a penalty soon after the Scots found themselves 10-0 down before they had even got started.

              But they responded magnificently on 13 minutes. Having been criticised for their insistence on going wide against Wales, Scotland showed they are capable of bludgeoning right up the middle as Jonny Gray sat Machenaud down with a shuddering shoulder barge.

              Grant Gilchrist and Russell then moved the ball quickly out to Maitland to dot down in the corner.

              Russell’s errant kicking let the French off the hook as he failed to find touch and that mistake was punished on 27 minutes as Thomas’ wizardry once again opened up the Scots.

              He picked up the ball again as France swept left to right and chipped the ball over Hogg before charging for the line.

              But just as Laidlaw looked set to bail out the hosts, a wicked bounce took the former skipper out of the equation and Thomas was left free to score.

              Scotland, though, were proving harder to shake off than last week and hit back again on 31 minutes.

              Hogg’s drive split the French defence and with Les Bleus scrambling for cover Jones spotted a chink as he raced in to score under the posts.

              The teams then exchanged a pair of penalties apiece as Machenaud and Baptiste Serin knocked over for France, with Laidlaw twice responding for Scotland.

              France again turned up the pressure but all they got was another Serin penalty as the Scots stood firm through 20 bruising phases – but again Scotland battled back with Laidlaw knocking over two kicks to put them level with 16 minutes left.

              Now it was Scotland mounting the cavalry charge, forcing France to concede yet another penalty on 70 minutes which Laidlaw once again punished to put Townsend’s team in front for the first time.

              The Clermont Auvergne scrum-half then made sure of the victory with three minutes left as he again fired over.

              Key Events

              Week 2 Six Nations results – Scotland 32-26 France

              Scotland reignited their Six Nations campaign as Greig Laidlaw inspired a tense comeback win over France at Murrayfield.

              France capitulated in the second half as Laidlaw’s razor sharp boot produced 22 points and saw the hosts bounce back from their heavy defeat by Wales in the Championship opener.

              Tries from Sean Maitland and Huw Jones provided the perfect response after Teddy Thomas’s blistering pace had twice cut them apart in an entertaining first half.

              That left the game finely poised after the break but Laidlaw – making his first Scotland start in a year – slotted over all eight of his kicks to breathe fresh life into Scottish championship hopes.

              It has been quite the turnaround from the Scots.

              Could they be Six Nations challengers again soon?

              Week 2 Six Nations results – England 12-6 Wales

              England have overcome Wales with two early Jonny May tries and a brilliant try-saving tackle from Sam Underhill proving the difference.

              May scored the only five pointers, both inside the first 20 minutes, as Eddie Jones’ England kept their Grand Slam aspirations alive at Twickenham.

              Controversy clouded the result, however, after television match official Glenn Newman ruled out a try for Gareth Anscombe when Wales trailed 12-0 before the break.

              Anscombe appeared to get downward pressure with an outstretched hand at the end of an attack down the left wing, but Newman thought otherwise and a key moment had fallen in England’s favour.

              The decision proved critical as a late penalty by Anscombe reduced their lead to six points.

              It took a try-saving tackle from Sam Underhill to again deny Wales in a second half dominated by the visitors, who were missing seven Test British and Irish Lions including Leigh Halfpenny, a casualty before kick due to an unspecified injury.

              Week 2 Six Nations results – Ireland 56-19 Italy

              Robbie Henshaw ran in two tries but trudged off the Aviva Stadium field with his right arm in a sling as Ireland thumped Italy 56-19 in the NatWest 6 Nations.

              Tadhg Furlong limped out after just three minutes with a left hamstring injury, joining Henshaw as a doubt to take any further part in the tournament.

              Jacob Stockdale also bagged a brace, with Conor Murray, Bundee Aki, Keith Earls and Rory Best all crossing as Ireland racked up eight tries.

              Tommaso Allan, Edoardo Gori and Matteo Minozzi hit back late for Italy, but the visitors had already been easily overwhelmed by Ireland’s starting XV.

              Sam Warburton reacts

              Wales skipper Warburton is on the BBC punditry team and he had this to say:

              “Scotland were quite direct, they made France tackle and that makes teams tired. You crash at the 60-minute mark and I think the first half took its toll on the French. Penalties win matches, Greig kicked six in a row, and every time they went forward, France gave one away.

              “When he went to 10, it was a big turning point. Scotland played with a lot more energy, it lifted the stadium and they closed the game out.”

              John Barclay reacts

              The Scottish captain has spoken to the BBC:

              “We made it hard on ourselves, we got off to a poor start but at half-time we knew if we held the ball we would cause them trouble. We were a lot more accurate than last week but still not quite there.

              “If you lose the first match, and are serious about the competition the maths is simple. We knew we had to put in a performance after last week.”

              Scotland vs France recap

              France looked so good in the first half – Scotland needed to be at their best to keep it within six points.

              Then a flurry of penalties from Laidlaw and Scotland were ahead.

              From there it was easy peasy.

              Important win for the Scots, the French remain winless.

              Six Nations standings

              4. Scotland 4pts

              Laidlaw reacts

              Laidlaw speaks to the BBC:

              “It wasn’t pretty at times today.

              “Sometimes you just have to kick in a tight match.

              “I am proud of the team today, the forwards dug so deep.

              “I am not a very good watcher so it was great to get back on the field.

              “I was rolling back the years playing at fly half at times today.

              “It has been a few years since we have turned England over, but we’re looking forward to it.”

              SCOTLAND WIN

              Only Scotland’s third over victory over France in the history on the Six Nations.

              The clock goes red.

              Scotland have a penalty.

              And that is that!

              Man of the match

              79 minutes

              They have been awful in this second half.

              And from the line out they give away a penalty.

              Scotland celebrate. They can sense the win as they take the scrum.

              Playing this one out.

              78 minutes

              Scotland don’t roll away at a ruck.

              Penalty France, but they aren’t kick for goal with two minutes to go.

              Dangerous times here from the line out 20 metres out.

              PENALTY SCOTLAND – 31-26

              Golden boot Laidlaw again.

              The noise in Murrayfield erupts again.

              France need a converted try to get back ahead now.

              74 minutes

              France finally get a moment of ball in hand.

              Hands in the ruck turn the ball over.

              Scotland kick to touch, and it is superb.

              Line out right in France territory.

              PENALTY SCOTLAND – 29-26

              Laidlaw has nerves of steel.

              He really has got his shooting boots on this afternoon.

              Seven from seven now.

              Scotland LEAD with 10 minutes to go.

              69 minutes

              Bhatti and Berghan breach tackles, Scotland are well on top.

              The hosts win another penalty, they would have wanted a try there as they headed towards the try line.

              They will kick though. to go ahead for the first time.

              67 minutes

              Good defence in the end from France.

              Really well held up.

              But it will be a scrum on the five metre line – France to put in.

              Poirot hooks back and a massive kick gets the ball back up field.

              Scotland’s hopes

              They certainly have the impetus.

              Scotland kick when they shouldn’t.

              But they get the ball back and a slip causes chaos.

              PENALTY SCOTLAND 26-26

              Scotland are finally back level.

              From the kick off France knock on.

              Can Scotland get ahead from this scrum?

              64 minutes

              Scotland win a penalty from the scrum.

              Chance for Laidlaw to kick them level.

              62 minutes

              Risky stuff from France.

              Quick push passes rather than taking it in hands and they are punished.

              A knock on and Scotland have a put in a t the scrum.

              Could be a chance coming from here it Laidlaw keeps his head.

              SCOTLAND PENALTY – 23-26

              Laidlaw keeps up his 100 per cent record this afternoon.

              To be fair this one was dead centre and would have been harder to miss.

              Back down to three points again.

              60 minutes

              Scotland reach the 22-metre line.

              But guess what. France have given away a penalty.

              Laidlaw to kick at goal again.

              Penalties o’clock

              These have been regular views in the second half.

              Every point after the break have come from penalties.

              PENALTY FRANCE – 20-26

              Serin pings over.

              If Scotland lose this it will be down to their poor discipline.

              Some of the penalties have been very careless.

              56 minutes

              France are 10 metres out.

              . they also have an advantage.

              Vakatawa beats a tackle but makes an infringement and the penalty is given.

              53 minutes

              Bit of handbags on the touchline.

              This game is still open for any one to win.

              50 minutes

              Ten minutes gone in the second half and there is only one word to describe it.

              France have a rare scrum after a knock on 40 metres out.

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